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9 May 2014

09 May 2014

Latest update from Michael Walker, our Head of Garden and Estate about the introduction of rare breed Red Poll Cattle

In due course, the Red Poll will also graze the upper areas of North Park where they should prove indispensable in helping to create the lost Heathland habitat. Grazing was a traditional use of lowland heathland, until its decline in the twentieth century. Heathlands were important for cattle grazing and such areas became a distinctive part of the cultural landscape in many of the counties of England, including Staffordshire. The presence of livestock on parks and heathland sites, has over many years contributed to their distinctive character, the structure of habitats and the diversity of species found there. The decline in grazing management of most heathlands in the last century has update this delicate balance and led to a loss of species diversity. The reintroduction of livestock grazing to sites such as North Park is part of a long-term plan to enhance biodiversity. It’s is an important element of the restoration of the parkland, and its maintenance.
Walking with cattle is a pleasant experience and to enjoy it we ask that you follow our tips for walking with livestock. Please do not feed or touch the cows. Make sure that the animals know you’re there. If an animal is startled, do not run. Keep small children close to you and do not leave bags or pushchairs unattended. Please follow the country code when enjoying the park, keep dogs on a lead at all times (worrying cattle is a legal offence protected by law), and take litter home with you.
Thank you.

We have today introduced 11 Red Poll Cattle to the North Park, marking another significant stage in the development of the project.

Red Poll is a rare breed which we are introducing as part of the Higher Level Stewardship agreement we have in place with Natural England to support the conservation management of the estate, including the North Park.

In due course, the Red Poll will also graze the upper areas of North Park where they should prove indispensable in helping to create the lost Heathland habitat. Grazing was a traditional use of lowland heathland, until its decline in the twentieth century. Heathlands were important for cattle grazing and such areas became a distinctive part of the cultural landscape in many of the counties of England, including Staffordshire. The presence of livestock on parks and heathland sites, has over many years contributed to their distinctive character, the structure of habitats and the diversity of species found there. The decline in grazing management of most heathlands in the last century has upset this delicate balance and led to a loss of species diversity. The reintroduction of livestock grazing to sites such as North Park is part of a long-term plan to enhance biodiversity. It’s is an important element of the restoration of the parkland, and its maintenance.

Walking with cattle is a pleasant experience and to enjoy it we ask that you follow our tips for walking with livestock. Please do not feed or touch the cows. Make sure that the animals know you’re there. If an animal is startled, do not run. Keep small children close to you and do not leave bags or pushchairs unattended. Please follow the country code when enjoying the park, keep dogs on a lead at all times (worrying cattle is a legal offence protected by law), and take litter home with you.

Thank you.

UPDATE: May 2017 The Red Poll cattle no longer graze at Trentham.

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