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Follow in the footsteps of Capability Brown, at Trentham

13 January 2015

Follow in the footsteps of Capability Brown, at Trentham

Tipped to take a leading role in one of the most important horticultural celebrations of recent times, The Trentham Estate on the edge of Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, is currently offering its visitors the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of Lancelot Capability Brown.

The tercentenary of Capability Brown will be celebrated across the UK in 2016.  And The Trentham Estate - one of Brown’s most celebrated successes during the 18th century - is now involved in what is currently one of the biggest parkland projects in Britain.

A project aimed at rediscovering Capability’s lost landscape, the scheme has already started to take shape, and will continue to develop and mature through 2016 - and beyond.

Anyone interested in learning more can join a Capability Brown Landscape Tour, which are scheduled for Sunday January 18th, Wednesday January 21st, and Sunday February 8th.  The Sunday walks start at 1.30pm; and the Wednesday walk at 1pm.  They are free for annual ticket holders, as well as day visitors buying the winter admission ticket for just £4.20.

As well as hearing about the major restoration project walkers will also learn about Brown’s enormous impact at The Trentham Estate, from enlarging the lake to creating parkland.  The tour will explore the restored connection between Kings Wood and the lake, point-out a number of Brownian aged trees between the amphitheatre and the bird hide, and visit the recently revealed Victorian Red Woods.  Future plans - including the introduction of grazing, and the opportunity to reinvigorate some of the present-day lakeside attractions - will also be highlighted on a tour which will take-in the remains of Trentham Hall, the discovery of the once forgotten Ice House and the location of the world’s second oldest cast iron bridge, constructed in 1779.

Brown was employed at Trentham from 1759 to 1780 and extended the mile long lake and the surrounding parklands in the gardens.  As a result The Trentham Estate will play a significant role in this celebration by better revealing and further enhancing the presentation of Brown’s work.

The ongoing project, which is explained to Trentham’s current-day visitors via a series of interpretation panels and guided tours, is also helping to better identify the line of a former Ha-ha (a way to prevent grazing livestock from entering the gardens without obstructing the views), a Georgian triple tunnel boat house, and the location of the Georgian Ice House.

The Trentham Estate re-opened to the public ten years ago, and has won one of Europe’s top awards for its restoration work.  Famous for its historic Italian Gardens, and for Piet Oudolf’s Rivers Of Grass, Trentham is the fifth most visited “paid-for” gardens attraction in the UK.  It is also in the running for the BBC Countryfile Magazine Garden of the Year award.

For further details, visit www.trentham.co.uk.

ENDS

For all media information, photo-opportunities and images, please contact:

Amanda Dawson. Tel: 01782 657341. E-mail: adawson@trentham.co.uk

Notes to editors:

The Trentham Estate, on the edge of Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, offers one of the UK’s most diverse days out with a range of leisure activities for all ages.

It is one of the country’s top leisure destinations, attracting more than 3m visitors per year and was Highly Commended by VisitEngland in the Large Visitor Attraction category in their Awards for Excellence 2014. The fabulous restored Trentham Gardens at the heart of the Estate welcomed 430,000 paying visitors in 2013 - making them one of the most visited Gardens in the UK.  Owned by St. Modwen Properties PLC, the UK’s leading regeneration specialist, the 725-acre Estate - which was previously owned for over 400 years by the Dukes of Sutherland - has undergone a massive regeneration programme since 2003. It boasts the famous Trentham Gardens, including the very important Italianate Gardens designed by Charles Barry in the 1830s that have been lovingly restored using top landscape designers. The gardens feature the UK’s first ‘barefoot’ walk, a great children’s adventure play area and maze and a beautiful walk around the mile long lake; the Trentham Garden Centre and Shopping Village, an eclectic mix of shops and eateries; Trentham Monkey Forest - home to 140 endangered Barbary macaques; Aerial Extreme, an exhilarating treetop high rope adventure course, and a 119 bedroom Premier Inn hotel.

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